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"Rhino Liner" over entire vehicle


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#1 PosterBoy

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 03:32 PM

A while back I saw a truck that was completely covered in what appeared to be spray-on truck bed liner. I heard that it was "Rhino Liner," which from what little I've read seems to be a fantastic product. I had a second hand source from a quick google check that stated a few actual applications of the product besides truck bed liners, one of which was the coating on the HMMWV (Humvees) as well as things like snow plow blades. I never realized this to be true of the hummers I witnessed, and I really couldn't tell you anything except that whatever finish they did have was pretty great.

I only wanted to share what I thought was a great idea. It would be clearly advantageous with the added durability over regular paint and simple added convenience of care. It seems that Rhino Liner comes in any color, too. Has anyone else thought about this?

No, I'm not about to go drop the money to do this to our VW, but I've been keeping an interest in an ideal vehicle (for me: convenience of self-maintenance, maximum durability, utility, and economy) that I work toward for the future.

I'm not a mechanic, and from what little I've learned about engines has been from fixing my '78 Yamaha motorcycle, which is what I commute with on days that are above freezing and clear of rain. I haven't taken it apart or anything, except for the carbs. I imagine I'd like a truck engine that was KISS. As for the body/suspension, I'm not sure whether new or old models would be better in terms of durability and utility.
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#2 Theduardo

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 03:49 PM

I always wondered what it would take to get the license and equipment for that bed liner process. I tend to think it could be a great alternative roofing material. Best if it can be done in colors other than black.
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#3 crackshot

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 04:44 PM

I have it done to the rocker panels on my truck but just the rockers to protect from rock chips.
Mine is Line-X an you cannot peel that stuff away if you tried.

The thing about doing your entire vehicle is it adds weight.

I think it looks like crap on your whole vehicle IMO.

Yes you can have different colors blended.

#4 purple

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 06:37 PM

Had my old 4 wheel drive truck done. It cost me a pretty penny but when I added my snorkel and drove it under the river, it was worth ever penny. I stripped the body clean and trailered it into the shop where they sprayed it all. The hardest parts was where I forgot to plug some bolt holes. Putting it back together was hard and after that I painted over it. Damn I wish I could upload pics but my systems are down. Maybe I will bring them to the show n tell in the desert. :huh:
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#5 Geo

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 10:03 PM

I think it looks like crap on your whole vehicle IMO.


Yep.
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#6 PosterBoy

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 12:47 AM

I don't care what it looks like. Basically, I want to build a truck that will last 100+ years with minimum maintenance. I'm no engineer, but when the hell are we going to start making things that last? I'm tired of waxing my car. I want to be able to spray it down with a hose and be done with it, and not worry about the finish.

The same goes for my house, which I have already started laying out plans for. I want to build a house that will be standing in 500 years, while benefiting from new, more efficient design.

I love the idea of the roof - maybe metal with a light colored coating? I know there's always an initial price shock for stuff like that, as well as things like wind power, which I'm in also in favor of. There are trade off's I'm willing to make in order to afford things like this, namely asthetic apeal and creature comfort. If I could install a roof that would last forever, I would do that before finishing touches like flooring, 2nd bath fixtures, etc. So far, all I've looked into is stone, but even that has problems.
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#7 crackshot

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 12:19 PM

I don't care what it looks like. Basically, I want to build a truck that will last 100+ years with minimum maintenance. I'm no engineer, but when the hell are we going to start making things that last? I'm tired of waxing my car. I want to be able to spray it down with a hose and be done with it, and not worry about the finish.

The same goes for my house, which I have already started laying out plans for. I want to build a house that will be standing in 500 years, while benefiting from new, more efficient design.

I love the idea of the roof - maybe metal with a light colored coating? I know there's always an initial price shock for stuff like that, as well as things like wind power, which I'm in also in favor of. There are trade off's I'm willing to make in order to afford things like this, namely asthetic apeal and creature comfort. If I could install a roof that would last forever, I would do that before finishing touches like flooring, 2nd bath fixtures, etc. So far, all I've looked into is stone, but even that has problems.


All building materials has it's advantages and disadvantages. If done right, traditional wood framing can last quite a few lifetimes.
I lived in a house that was from the 1800's for 5 years and was built like a tank.

#8 Thrawn

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 01:36 PM

When that stuff first came out there was a chevy in HotRod that some one had done the whole car in orange bedliner, It was different and neat.
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#9 Chris

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 02:41 PM

I was thinking of having the whole inside of my Jeep Rhino linered.
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#10 zen

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 10:35 PM

I'm no engineer, but when the hell are we going to start making things that last?


uh... a hundred years ago?
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#11 Tobus

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 06:55 AM

The same goes for my house, which I have already started laying out plans for. I want to build a house that will be standing in 500 years, while benefiting from new, more efficient design.

You might want to look into the way they build houses in Switzerland. Their building codes are such that any new construction has to be built to last a long, long time. As a result, their houses are hella expensive. But they do last a long time.

As for making your car's finish last longer, just do what I do: nothing. My theory is that the more dirt and crap I can keep on my car, the more protection it offers to the finish underneath. You guys who wash and wax your vehicles on a regular basis are wearing your finish out. B)

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#12 PosterBoy

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 02:28 AM

Howard Roark?

English written article, French hosted website, Swiss built house, Nunatak Architectes

ETA: Courtesy of Daylight and Architecture Magazine, Autumn 2006

Posted Image

Edited by PosterBoy, 05 March 2010 - 02:51 AM.

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#13 Oroboros

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 05:40 AM

Howard Roark?

English written article, French hosted website, Swiss built house, Nunatak Architectes

ETA: Courtesy of Daylight and Architecture Magazine, Autumn 2006

Posted Image


Did you scan that rendering from the magazine, or are they online?

"That the principle of allowing each man to have, (so far as it is consistent with the principles of natural law that he can have,) all the fruits of his own labour, would conduce to a more just and equal distribution of wealth than now exists, is a proposition too self-evident almost to need illustration. It is an obvious principle of natural justice, that each man should have the fruits of his own labour... It is also an obvious fact, that the property produced by society, is now distributed in very unequal proportions among those whose labour produced it, and with very little regard to the actual value of each one’s labour in producing it." — Lysander Spooner

"These tyrants, living solely on plunder, and on the labour of their slaves, and applying all their energies to the seizure of still more plunder, and the enslavement of still other defenseless persons; increasing, too, their numbers, perfecting their organisations, and multiplying their weapons of war, they extend their conquests until, in order to hold what they have already got, it becomes necessary for them to act systematically, and co-operate with each other in holding their slaves in subjection." [ibid.]


#14 PosterBoy

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 08:41 AM

Did you scan that rendering from the magazine, or are they online?


I used "snipping tool" on a .pdf of their magazine.

ETA: I don't understand the language, but the company's home page through projects/logements/zuffrey has a different picture. They frame the photo of the house in it's environment well.

Edited by PosterBoy, 05 March 2010 - 08:48 AM.

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#15 PosterBoy

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 02:25 PM

uh... a hundred years ago?


If we're considering automobiles, I would have to disagree. Over the course of time you will end up replacing most of the car, part by part. I'm wondering why it wouldn't be cheaper to have something like a battery powered car. I really think the modern combustion engine will prove to be too complicated at an acceptable efficiency. Now, let me remind you I'm not an engineer, but less moving parts means better design, less wear, and less parts to replace. I really wish the multitude of components in a car didn't wear out, and I wouldn't have to be replacing bits here and there.

Is this just not profitable to producers at the moment? If I had the money, I would peice it together myself just for fun. Of course, if I had the money, I wouldn't have to repair anything myself.
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#16 Oroboros

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 04:38 PM

I used "snipping tool" on a .pdf of their magazine.

ETA: I don't understand the language, but the company's home page through projects/logements/zuffrey has a different picture. They frame the photo of the house in it's environment well.


Do you have that PDF, or did you find it online? If you have it, can you send it to me or put it on scribd?

Here's a translated version of the architect's site (from French).

"That the principle of allowing each man to have, (so far as it is consistent with the principles of natural law that he can have,) all the fruits of his own labour, would conduce to a more just and equal distribution of wealth than now exists, is a proposition too self-evident almost to need illustration. It is an obvious principle of natural justice, that each man should have the fruits of his own labour... It is also an obvious fact, that the property produced by society, is now distributed in very unequal proportions among those whose labour produced it, and with very little regard to the actual value of each one’s labour in producing it." — Lysander Spooner

"These tyrants, living solely on plunder, and on the labour of their slaves, and applying all their energies to the seizure of still more plunder, and the enslavement of still other defenseless persons; increasing, too, their numbers, perfecting their organisations, and multiplying their weapons of war, they extend their conquests until, in order to hold what they have already got, it becomes necessary for them to act systematically, and co-operate with each other in holding their slaves in subjection." [ibid.]


#17 PosterBoy

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 04:52 PM

Here's the .pdf

There are more pictures in the .pdf, including a picture of a vehicle parked under the "ledge."
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#18 Oroboros

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 05:59 PM

Here's the .pdf

There are more pictures in the .pdf, including a picture of a vehicle parked under the "ledge."



Thanks man!

"That the principle of allowing each man to have, (so far as it is consistent with the principles of natural law that he can have,) all the fruits of his own labour, would conduce to a more just and equal distribution of wealth than now exists, is a proposition too self-evident almost to need illustration. It is an obvious principle of natural justice, that each man should have the fruits of his own labour... It is also an obvious fact, that the property produced by society, is now distributed in very unequal proportions among those whose labour produced it, and with very little regard to the actual value of each one’s labour in producing it." — Lysander Spooner

"These tyrants, living solely on plunder, and on the labour of their slaves, and applying all their energies to the seizure of still more plunder, and the enslavement of still other defenseless persons; increasing, too, their numbers, perfecting their organisations, and multiplying their weapons of war, they extend their conquests until, in order to hold what they have already got, it becomes necessary for them to act systematically, and co-operate with each other in holding their slaves in subjection." [ibid.]


#19 Thrawn

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 09:04 PM

If we're considering automobiles, I would have to disagree. Over the course of time you will end up replacing most of the car, part by part. I'm wondering why it wouldn't be cheaper to have something like a battery powered car. I really think the modern combustion engine will prove to be too complicated at an acceptable efficiency. Now, let me remind you I'm not an engineer, but less moving parts means better design, less wear, and less parts to replace. I really wish the multitude of components in a car didn't wear out, and I wouldn't have to be replacing bits here and there.

Is this just not profitable to producers at the moment? If I had the money, I would peice it together myself just for fun. Of course, if I had the money, I wouldn't have to repair anything myself.


"last" is a relative term. Even the universe will eventually stop.

I wish a Ford and a Chevy would still last ten years like they should...


I always liked this line of that song due to the fact that ten years isn't shit for most production vehicles made within the last 20 years or so. It isn't uncommon for one to go 100,000 miles or ten years before their first required ignition tune up. Higher nickel content in blocks help cylinders last longer and synthetic lubricants not only provide better friction coefficient, but also allow for tighter tolerances to be used. Roller bearings in lifters and rockers make for a major reduction in engine friction, allowing for increased longevity. I'm no engineer myself, but I can assure you that a newer "roller" engine has a hellva lot more moving parts than it's older flat tappet cammed counter part, but is vastly more efficient.
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#20 Tobus

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Posted 08 March 2010 - 07:01 AM

Is this just not profitable to producers at the moment?

Consumers don't want it. Let's be honest here. Americans like disposable things. The majority of consumers don't want a car to last more than a few years anyway, because they'll be tired of it by then and will want to by the newer shinier model. Hell, there are plenty of perfectly good cars every year that go to the scrap yard because nobody wants them any more. It's not because they've worn out or fallen apart from old age.

Auto makers could build a car or truck that would last a long time, but it would fail to sell, and here's why: Americans are cheap bastards. We say we want quality, but we don't want to pay for quality. This is why Walmart is the king of retail, folks.

As for trucks not lasting 10 years any more, I'll disagree. My 2002 F150 is getting close to the 10 year mark and it's still running strong. And I abuse the shit out of it, since I use it as a work truck around the homestead. It's all scratched up from driving through heavy brush and trees. The front bumper is dented where my wife ran into a fence post when she swerved to miss a deer. It has gouge marks in the hood from where one of my horses decided to chew on it (I have no idea why, but he likes it). The inside stays dirty and muddy and smells like stale cigarettes. Oh, and it also smells like mildew because the back window leaks when it rains. My wife routinely uses that truck to pull our horses wherever she wants to go, I've used it to haul building materials and loads of hay. I've towed well in excess of its rated towing capacity. And while it doesn't have the power I'd really like out of a work truck, it has held up to the abuse very well. It still runs great, and it has about 105,000 miles on it. It does have some minor quirks, but it's a strong running truck and I have no doubt it will last many more years as long as I maintain it properly.

I would think that the vast majority of truck owners (i.e. city folks who never take their trucks off-road or use them for anything besides moving grandma's couch) would get even more life out of their trucks than me.

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